Triple O Ranch Aussies
Miniature Australian Shepherd Puppy For Sale in BIRCHWOOD, TN

Ad Statistics

Ad ID: ADN-19878
Times Ad Viewed: 228 times
Date Listed: 11/26/2016
Date Expires: 12/26/2016

verified verified Owner Information

Seller Name: Scott
Location: BIRCHWOOD, TN 37308
(423) 421-1809


Breed: Miniature Australian Shepherd
Price: $500
Gender: Female Female
Nickname:

Heidi

Age: 9 Weeks Old
Size at Maturity: Small
Availability Date: 11/27/2016
Shipping Area: Pick Up Only
Payment Method: Cash
Litter of 2
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Tags: Miniature Aussies

Litter Description:

Beautiful Black Tri Male and Female. Tails docked and dew claws removed. Vet checked and up to date on all shots. ASDR Registered. Ready for their forever homes. Contact Scott for more info: 423-421-1809

Puppy Description:

Adorable Black Tri Female. Smallest of the litter.

Items Included: Vet check/ Shots/ Wormed/ Dew claws removed/ Tails docked

Miniature Australian Shepherd

A.K.A. : Toy Australian Shepherd, Mini Australian Shepherd, Mini Aussie
Overview: The Miniature Australian Shepherd is a well-balanced dog of medium size and bone. He is attentive and animated, showing strength and stamina combined with unusual agility. Slightly longer than tall, he has a coat of moderate length and coarseness with coloring that offers variety and individuality in each specimen. An identifying characteristic is his natural or docked bobtail. In each sex, masculinity or feminity is well-defined. Bone is moderate and clean with coarseness, heaviness or lightness being undesirable. Overall type, balance of conformation and movement are valued more highly than individual structural perfections because it is balance which enables him to fulfill his purpose.
Breed Group: Herding
Weight (lbs): 20-40
Height (in): 13-18
Colors: All colors are strong, clear and rich. The recognized colors are blue merle, red (liver) merle, solid black and solid red (liver) and with or without white markings and/or tan (copper) points with no preference.
Coat: Of medium texture, straight to slightly wavy, weather resistant, of moderate length with an undercoat.
Character: The Miniature Australian Shepherd is intelligent, primarily a working dog of strong herding and guardian instincts, he is an exceptional companion. He is versatile and easily trained, performing his assigned tasks with great style and enthusiasm. He is reserved with strangers but does not exhibit shyness. Although an aggressive, authoritative worker, viciousness toward people or animals is intolerable.
Temperament: Miniature Australian Shepherds are easy going, perpetual puppies that love to play. Courageous, loyal and affectionate, they are excellent children's companions that are great with active children. A devoted friend and guardian, for they are naturally protective. Very lively, agile, and attentive, they are eager to please with a sixth sense about what the owner wants.
Care: The coat of the Miniature Australian Shepherd is easy to groom and needs little attention. Brush occasionally with a firm bristle brush and bathe only when necessary. This breed is an average shedder.
Training: This breed is quite intelligent, learning tasks very rapidly. Therefore, training is easy and quick.
Activity: This energetic dog needs plenty of vigorous exercise to stay in shape.
Country of Origin: USA
Health Issue: Hip and eye problems can occur. Ensure sire and dam of puppies have been tested and are certified clear prior to purchasing a puppy.
Life Expectancy: 12-13

More About Miniature Australian Shepherd Breed

Before getting a new puppy, make sure you are prepared to share your life with a new family member for the next 15 or more years! Owning a dog is a big responsibility!

Questions You Should Ask the Breeder

1. Are the puppies' parents "certified"? This means that certain breeds are often at risk for genetic conditions such as hip problems, heart problems and eye problems. Most of these diseases are inherited, meaning the disease is passed from parent to puppy. Many breeders will have their dogs evaluated and tested for that disease and ultimately "certified" by a veterinary specialist to be disease-free. 

2. What are the sizes of the puppy's parents? Know how big the parents are, to get a good idea of how big your puppy will be. Is that the size dog you want? 

3. Ask to meet the dogs parents. If possible, meet the puppy's parents. Notice if they appear to be in good health and evaluate their overall temperament. Are they shy, aggressive, or well adjusted? 

4. How have they socialized the pups? Have the pups been around other dogs? Other people? Socialization is critical in puppies 6 – 16 weeks old. Proper socialization consisting of good experiences of a puppy with other puppies and lots of different ages, sizes and types of people will give you the best chance at having a well-adjusted dog. 

5. What vaccines has the puppy had? How many shots has he received and when will the puppy be due for his next puppy shot?

6. Have the puppies been dewormed? All puppies are born with worms and routine deworming is recommended. 

7. Have any of the puppies in the litter been sick? If so, what were the signs, the diagnosis and treatment? 

8. What visits has the puppies had with the veterinarian? Have they been examined and declared "healthy"? If not, what problems have they had? Have they been on any medications? 

9. What is their guarantee? What guarantee does the breeder give with their puppies? If the puppy is found to have a severe illness, what will they do? This is a difficult topic but one that is a lot easier to cover up front rather than later. 

10. Recommendations? Ask the breeder for a couple references of puppy owners that they have sold within the past year. CALL them. Find out if the breeder was fair, if they were happy with their pups, and how any problems were handled. 

11. Breeders contract? Does your breeder require a breeder's contract? If so, what is in it? Is the breeder willing to take back the puppy at any time, if you can't keep it? 

12. Limited registration. Some breeders require that you spay or neuter your dog by a certain age. If that is the case, that may not be a problem but it is best to know before you get your puppy. 

13. What is the family history? Ask if the breeder has information about the breed line. For example, ask how long the dogs have lived and what they have died from. Write it down. This may be important for monitoring your pet as he gets older. 

14. What is the breeder currently feeding the puppy? Regardless of what they are feeding, it is ideal to continue feeding the same food for the first few days at home to minimize the risk of gastrointestinal disturbances. If you choose to change the diet, do it gradually. 

15. Health certificate and certificate of sale. Ask the breeder if he will supply a health certificate for the puppy issued by his veterinarian. Some states require also a certificate of sale.

16. Does the breeder belong to a breed club? Ask for references.

Get your questions answered and feel very comfortable with your new puppy. 


 
 
 
 
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